It’s Sunday – Does that mean I have to sing “Oceans” Again?

Over the last 3 months, I have visited at least 9 churches in the Medford, OR area. As a new resident, I have been checking out the local stores, coffee spots and cuisine as well as local congregations. Going to a new church is probably the toughest! Visiting churches can be enjoyable, as I am able to see what’s happening and what’s being done on Sunday morning in regard to music and preaching but on the other hand it is difficult as an introvert and a male 60 years old to walk into a new building, alone. I struggle with being overly self-conscious of my status as a visitor and stranger who wants to be welcomed and feel a part but not interrogated as to my business being there, job status, and spiritual condition. I recognize it’s a tough job for anyone greeting or meeting me! Yet, I persist, in my curiosity and desire to see what God’s up to and find a place I might belong. Ages ago, I worked for STAPLES, the office supply company. They were part of a program called “Mystery Shopper” that sent people into stores to see how the staff did, i.e. helpfulness, courteousness, knowledge and how long it took for staff to greet & offer help. Since one of my pastimes is writing amateur reviews for places I visit, I thought I would come up with my own rating system for churches as a “Mystery Worshipper.” The following are the categories I chose to rate on a scale of 1-10 (1=poor / 10= excellent).
Music and singing:
Message / Preaching:

Order of service / Liturgy (Prayer – Offering – Lord’s Table). I define liturgy in part as a predictable pattern of spiritual actions repeated each week in a gathered worship service. By that definition, all churches are liturgical, in that they have a set pattern of what happens when every Sunday or meeting time from songs, announcements, offering, prayer and message. Of course, you can test this by changing the order and see how people react! “Standard” refers to the current custom of music / message / offering.
Welcome & hospitality:
Coffee:
Mission to the area:
Theological spectrum:
Best moment:
Worst moment:

Did they sing that song? (Oceans by Hillsong – the over played, song that won’t end, the song leader’s back-up when there’s no energy to find something newer, better or more profound – like “Just as I am” for the previous generation).
Likelihood I’d come back:

 

Bethel Church at Vista Point – (5) 4245 Vista Pointe, Medford, OR

Music and singing: Praise band, enthusiastic, played around 20 minutes, no familiar songs sung. 

Message / Preaching: Associate pastor spoke on unity. Mentioned the Bible but did not explore any particular text.

Order of service – Standard.

Welcome & hospitality:  A lady asked if I needed help when I looked at the book’s in the foyer, shook a few hands.

Coffee: Available, did not try.

Mission to the area: Summer camp for area children was mentioned

Theological spectrum: Independent, charismatic (not part of Bethel in Redding, CA as far as I know).

Best moment: Allowing a woman to share what she felt was a word from God.

Worst moment: Speaker’s references to his accomplishments.

Did they sing that song?  Yes

Likelihood I’d come back: Perhaps

 

St. Andrews Anglican – (5)  305 North 5th Street, Jacksonville, OR

Music and singing: Organ accompaniment, traditional hymns (1940 Hymnal).

Message / Preaching: Lectionary based, quoted C.S. Lewis (of course!).

Order of service / Liturgy / Prayer / Offering / Lord’s Table: 1928 Prayer book.

Welcome & hospitality: Shook hands and spoke with pastor briefly.

Coffee: Available, didn’t try it. 

Mission to the area: Not sure

Theological spectrum: Conservative Anglican; break off from Episcopal Church / USA

Best moment: Familiar liturgy and words learned as a child.

Worst moment: Feeling like a relic in a museum.

Did they sing that song? No way!

Likelihood I’d come back: Maybe, if I want some old-time religion!

 

Living Waters – (4)    360 E Jackson, Medford, Oregon

Music and singing: Praise band, started with brief, instrumental “set-the- mood” music, current popular praise hits. 

Message / Preaching: Woman on staff spoke from letter to the Hebrews; To be clear, I enjoy women using their gifts as pastors in teaching and preaching but she didn’t really explore the text, nor highlight the key points of chapters 4 & 5, application did not seem connected to the text. 

Order of service – Standard: Worship leader said he was our “host” for the morning (!). Communion (crackers and juice) was announced but not explained, if I was a child, I would have thought it was snack time for adults!

Welcome & hospitality: Not greeted

 Coffee: Good!

Mission to the area: Not mentioned

Theological spectrum: Charismatic – (Four Square)

Best moment: Stand-up acoustic bass used in band.

Worst moment:  Not being able to find a free rest room.

Did they sing that song?  Afraid so!

Likelihood I’d come back: Unlikely

 

New Song – (5) 4041 Crater Lk. Ave. Suite E, Medford, OR. 97504

Music and singing:  Older praise band, competent but played in lower key; old praise songs.

Message / Preaching: Youth pastor spoke; used material from Bible study on communication; interesting and helpful but no real Bible text was explored or applied.

Order of service – Standard, crackers & juice.

Welcome & hospitality: Was welcomed by one gentleman and played 20 questions about why I was new to Medford.

Coffee: Yes, didn’t try.

Mission to the area: Pastor does street evangelism.

Theological spectrum: Charismatic; Bethel influence.

Best moment: When people shared word from the Lord.

Worst moment: Getting interrogated; someone touched my shoulder during worship, turned out a woman thought she should pray for me, but it is more polite to ask first!

Did they sing that song? Sadly, yes.

Likelihood I’d come back: Possible.

 

Journey Church – (5)   2399 S Pacific Hwy, Medford, OR

Music and singing: Very competent, praise group, enjoyable to listen to; songs lacked substance, usual clichés.

Message / Preaching: Well-structured and presented message on parable of Jesus, with humor, could tell the speaker had put his work into it as well as his biceps which were on display. However, he left out what was most important – Jesus’ own commentary on the parable!

Order of service: Standard – crackers & juice served.

Welcome & hospitality: One staff member shook my hand.

Coffee: Didn’t try it.

Mission to the area: Not mentioned.

Theological spectrum: Evangelical

Best moment: Listening to the praise group.

Worst moment: A distraught child, not well attended by his parents.

Did they sing that song? No

Likelihood I’d come back: While this church had the most coherent message, probably not.

 

Bear Creek – (3)  816 Black Oak Drive Medford OR 97504

Message / Preaching: Pastor was away, so there was no message but brief comments from a Paul Tripp book were read which was helpful but unclear as to what was his and what was not.

Order of service: Standard with part of a psalm read. Total service was less than 35 minutes, and that included a video for an upcoming visit by blogger Tim Challies, book critic, self-appointed discerner for Big Name Evangelical brands.

Welcome & hospitality: Absolutely zero.

Coffee: Didn’t try it.

Mission to the area: Not sure

Theological spectrum: Conservative, reformed evangelical, ala Gospel Coalition & Philadelphia / Westminster Seminary Magisterium. 

Best moment: 3 signs behind the band – Jesus as my prophet, priest and king – nice to be reminded of that!

Worst moment: We’re done already? 30 minutes? There is no one competent who could deliver a message?

Did they sing that song? Thankfully, no

Likelihood I’d come back: Nope

 

St. Mark’s Episcopal – (6)   140 N. Oakdale, Medford, OR

Music and singing: Organ, piano and hymns.

Message / Preaching: Lectionary, capable & coherent handling of the texts. 

Order of service / Liturgy / Prayer / Offering / Lord’s Table: 1982 Liturgy

Welcome & hospitality: A time for greeting.

Coffee: Not sure

Mission to the area: Food give away mentioned.

Theological spectrum: Old mainstream, liberal.

Best moment: Listening to the piano and gazing at the windows, beauty for my soul.

Worst moment: Arriving late due to special summer event & time change.

Did they sing that song? I don’t think they know it!

Likelihood I’d come back: Probably, not because I am a mainstream liberal but because it is the best compared to the alternatives.

 

Jacksonville Calvary – (3) 520 N. 5th Street, Jacksonville, OR. 97530

Music and singing: Nice & loud, rocking praise tunes.

Message / Preaching: Lengthy message on the church’s values. Straight forward, no frills, PowerPoint, delivered in drill sergeant style. I was ready to shout “Sir, yes sir!”

Order of service: Standard – meeting area was as dark as a movie theatre, no crackers & juice served.

Welcome & hospitality: Time of greeting, shook a few hands.

Coffee: None

Mission to the area: Not mentioned.

Theological spectrum: Pentecostal (Assembly of God).

Best moment: Noticing a mysterious fellow in the back, clad in shepherds garb looking like he wandered in from the hills of Palestine or last year’s nativity scene – seriously!

Worst moment: Came a stranger, left a stranger.

Did they sing that song? Yup.     

Likelihood I’d come back: Not likely

 

Empowered Life Church – (6) 322 S. PACIFIC HWY, TALENT, OR

 Music and singing: High energy, high volume, unfamiliar songs, smoking guitar work. Definitely a cardio work out and not for the faint of heart.

Message / Preaching: PowerPoint message on God as our dwelling place. Speaker seemed to be in a hurry or had too much coffee, but I agreed with his major points.

Order of service: Standard with extra time for prayer & getting foot loose.

Welcome & hospitality: Several people greeted me.

Coffee: Didn’t try it.

Mission to the area: Not mentioned.

Theological spectrum: Charismatic ala Bethel (Redding)

Best moment: When speaker said more than one conclusion that I had thought years ago!

Worst moment: Service starting and leader not able to be heard above the roar as people jabbered on and then waiting for people to get to their seats to start.

Did they sing that song? No.

Likelihood I’d come back: Possibly, when the adrenaline wears off.

Trinity Episcopal Church – (5) 44 North 2nd Street, Ashland, Oregon

Music and singing:  1982 Episcopal Hymnal, Traditional hymns, pipe organ and cantor.

Message / Preaching: Lectionary texts, generic message on giving each other slack, only time current president mentioned (negative) but also was included in prayers of the people.

Order of service: 1979 Book of Common Prayer.

Welcome & hospitality: Passed the peace

Coffee: Didn’t try it.

Mission to the area: Nothing specific mentioned.

Theological spectrum: Mainline liberal.

Best moment: Strong singing, cantor led in responsive song.

Worst moment: Asking visitors to stand and introduce themselves – introvert nightmare!

Did they sing that song? Thankfully, no.

Likelihood I’d come back:  Some more contemplative services mentioned which look intriguing.

Some biased observations from 24 plus years of preaching, worship leading and pastoring – the bulk of the time was given to the speaker. I heard no heresy or bizarre teaching, but the word of God was not the focus – it was the springboard for the speaker’s ideas. There was humor, stories, and a few PowerPoint Bible references but verses were plucked from here and there with no discernable exploration or explication of the word. In addition, besides an opening prayer, one for the offering and a closing one, any kind of prayer for the nation, our leaders, the church or the world were absent. On the positive side, there was only 1 instance of political commentary. However, if the rule of prayer is the rule of faith (lex ore, lex fide – as the ancients used to say), then I might assume that the “means of grace” is limited to singing, listening to a message, coffee, & crackers & juice.

It was evident the people gathering together and their leaders of where I’ve visited are sincere and committed to serving the Lord.  So many churches doing the same thing reminds me of competing franchises – each serving their version of their best burger -a different flavored bun, a new topping, a variation in seasoning but at the bare basics – the same. Like it or not, franchises compete for consumers and consumers, fickle creatures that we are, are drawn by the new, what’s popular or the hot feature of the moment.  Churches are tempted and challenged by the same market forces that shape consumer expectations as part of the “experience economy.” These may lead to a subtle (or not so subtle) competition.  

Will I return to any of these congregations? Will I pick one, join and get involved? I’m not sure. I realize that it takes more than a one-time visit to make an informed decision. The trouble is, I’m not much of a “joiner” these days and I’m not interested in an inward focused, building-based organization. Yes, I am a tough customer. I’ve been told “why bother” by others in the past but I am not ready to give up. My search continues.

An Incendiary Parable…

fire

It’s not exactly clear how the fire started. Some believe it happened when a huge storm rolled through the valley along with a brilliant lightning show with plenty of strikes up and down the area. It started burning slowly and then grew in intensity, quickly consuming the dry underbrush and trees. The first people that discovered it burning were surprised as it hadn’t happened in quite a while. Filled with elation and excitement, they started telling everyone else about it – as well as taking a branch, lit by the fire, back to their homes which had been cold for so long. Not familiar with the best way to keep safe, numerous accidents and injuries resulted and countless dwellings were incinerated.  The fire grew in ferocity and spread. More houses were consumed but visitors started showing up, mostly informed by word of mouth to watch the conflagration. They too tried to transport the fire home but found that the flames were not controllable or containable.

Others in the valley and town leaders watched in horror as the destruction increased. They began to speak out against the fire and the people that, in their opinion, had been more fascinated by it than in trying to put it out. They rallied and railed against the fire and the people they accused of helping it spread and get out of control. Those suspect were denounced and driven out of the valley in order for the proper fire fighting personnel and machinery to come in and deal with it. It was a difficult, costly and time-consuming effort but finally, the fire was extinguished and all that was left was smoldering remains of houses, acres of scorched land, smoking ash heaps.

But before the last ember was doused with retardant, the village leaders took a small branch, still burning, ever so slight and placed it in a great steel stove in large, vacant hall, converted just for the purpose of display. The mayor gave a grand speech. “We have through the mercy of God escaped the terrible destruction of the fire. We have been able to eliminate it but have reserved enough so that the dear, good-hearted people of this valley can come and visit it and be reminded of the fire’s terrible ferocity and how dangerous it truly is, as well as the proper method of containing it and controlling it.” The crow was grand that day, and it took hours for the people to pay their admission price and then slowly, ever so slowly, walk through the hall, with hushed “oohs” and “ahhs” (and numerous “shushes” to the eager children) by the great steel enclosure that contained the fire.

As the sun set, the mayor gathered his staff and congratulated them on a job well done. “That’s that! Now we can get back to life as normal! And frankly, I don’t ever want to see any fire again!” As the cool night descended upon the town, the crowds dispersed, the great hall locked up good and tight, no one noticed that the small branch, slowly burning all day, dwindled slowly, until the last red-orange embers changed to ash dull and cold grey.

The next day, the discovery made that the fire had died, and the news communicated to the mayor, he gathered his staff. Amid the questions and queries about what was to be done and what now and oh the waste, the mayor stood up and pronounced – “No fear! No fear! We will continue to have tours of our great hall, and people will continue to pay admission to see where the fire once brightly burned. Even better we will organize tours to the mountainside to show the people the dangers of the fire and the power and mastery we have displayed in defeating it.”

And so, it happened – the tours continued, visitors from all around kept coming and (perhaps most importantly) continued to pay admission for the esteemed privilege of seeing the place where the fire once burned brightly, but no more.

Weeks later, a small child, playing outside, watched as storm clouds started to build over the mountains of the valley. The wind picked up, and a few raindrops sprinkled her face. Farther away, she also noticed brilliant and terrible flashes of bright white, as the lightening, crackled from the clouds, skipped across the sky and headed once again to earth.

“I have come to bring fire on the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled!”

Luke 12:49

Humpty Drumpfy Tried to Build a Wall…

trump-wall-lego-set

Stable genius Drumpf, dreamt of a wall,

A big wall, a tall wall, bigger than all,

To keep those nasty immigrants out once and for all,

He got the idea in a Hannity phone call,

He told the MAGA hatters, Mexico would pay for it all,

He threatened, he bullied, he whined, shut down the government, employees and all,

Republicans scattered like rats in the hall,

He thought Nancy Pelosi was one of his cheap dolls,

But she said no and has him by the balls,

O what gall, this Drumpf (et al), we can’t wait till he finally falls!

(With apologies to my 4th grade poetry teacher)

Toxic Religion

J Jones - Nancy Wong photo

“Then Jesus began to say to them, “Beware that no one leads you astray.  Many will come in my name and say, ‘I am he!’ and they will lead many astray.”    Mark 13:5-6

(Lectionary Reading for 11/18/18).

40 years ago today,  Jim Jones killed over 918 people in the Jonestown massacre, the culmination of years of manipulation, misconduct, drug fueled paranoia, violence and abuse of all kinds. A one time, Methodist, Disciples of Christ, Assembly of God preacher who shared a platform once with William Branham, Jones developed his own eclectic blend of evangelical, social justice, inter-racial equality brand of religion at the People’s Temple in San Francisco, CA but ended in the forced death of his followers and U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan among others.

Jones has been one of many that promised heaven but delivered death. Others have followed like David Koresh (1993- 80 dead) and Heaven’s Gate (1997- 39). In these cases, toxic religion may have first been an opiate that turned into strychnine.

Faith is a force for good in our world. Distorted religion doesn’t present itself as poison. It may look like Kool Aid (or Flavor Aid) at first. But when the gospel is replaced by an ideology, whether of the left or the right, or MAGA nationalism, or supplanted by a cult of personality, along with authoritarian demands for obedience, idealized, hero worship of political leaders as god-like, spineless clergy and court paid prophets, the suppression of dissent and a major dose of media propaganda,  then the body count will eventually add up.

trump kool aid

40 Years later…

Ode to Green Beans

dorcas

The woman who created a Thanksgiving staple enjoyed by millions — the green bean casserole — has died at age 92. Dorcas Reilly died on Oct. 15, 2018.

Loved or hated, if you have ever been to a church pot-luck, funeral dinner or otherwise, chances are a green bean casserole was somewhere on the table.

Reilly was a Campbell Soup kitchen supervisor in 1955 when she combined the famous ingredients of the now-legendary green bean casserole (green beans, cream of mushroom soup, topped with crunchy fried onions) for an Associated Press feature.

As for myself, I usually skipped the beans and focused on the crunchy onions!

Source   – D. Reilly

 

 

One Hundred Years After…

R.M. Mitchell - LondonW. Jochman WWI

My maternal grandfather, R.M. Mitchell  (left) served in the British military. As far as family records indicate he signed-up in 1916. He may have been at the Battle of Cambrai 11/30/17. He later was in the Royal Navy and was aboard the “HMS Adventure” after the war and may have been in the harbor of Smyrna in 1919 when the Greeks occupied the city as the Ottoman Empire broke apart.

Though details are few, it seems my great-great-grand father in law, Philip Jochman, served in WWI – for the Germans of course. I don’t know much about him except for a photograph.

Two men – warring nations- opposite sides – same war – both survivors, now one family.

WWI was a colossal destruction of human life that led to another more destructive and horrendous conflagration. Today, we remember Armistice Day as well as our veterans, past and present, especially those who have served (and continue to serve) in the U.S.’s longest war  in Afghanistan. Having worked with veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan who are trying to rebuild their lives, recovering from physical injuries or the wounds one can’t see like PTSD, support and care is still needed beyond the bromides and promises from Washington and the fake patriotism of MAGA propaganda.

 

To vote or not to vote…

County-Election

Should Christians vote? Honestly, I’m surprised the question even comes up.

I find the “no vote” view short on hope and at times, heavy on eschatological despair and cynicism, that may lead to a contraction from engagement in society. It has a dualistic view of government that I don’t think is accurate in light of Jesus Christ as risen, victorious and reigning in heaven over all powers since his ascension. Rev. 11:15 declares “The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.” The aorist or past tense is used. That has been a present reality for almost 2,000 years. It is an accomplished fact. That shows some of my eschatological leanings. However, that does not mean I believe the current administration is the dawning of the millennium. Far from it. It’s testing the hearts of believers in this country to see where their allegiance lies – to the gospel or a vicious, white nationalist political ideology.

In contrast, I consider the example of the British member of Parliament and Christian believer, William Wilberforce who believed in political engagement for change and resulted in the end of legal slavery in the British Empire in 1807 (without a civil war as in the US, decades later). His life long battle had redemptive value that increased God’s justice and manifested God’s common grace in the world.

I have already voted for 2018. I count it a privilege to have a say in what happens in my community be it taxes, the retention of judges, public funding which helps pay for the roads I drive on or whether the incarceration of migrant children as young as 2 years old continues in the name of national security by my representatives in Congress. If the Apostle Paul, a citizen of heaven, used his Roman citizenship for the advancement of the gospel, then I think I ought to do the same when and where I can.

Voting or not voting, and who one votes for is ultimately up to each person that has no bearing on one’s salvific status.  But I’m all for an increase in God’s justice and common grace in the world.

Life is but a brief layover

Suicide

The news of the death of Anthony Bourdain was a shock to hear. I admit I don’t watch much TV, so I confess my ignorance, but he seems to have had a love for life, for adventure, for people and of course for good stuff to eat. Food seems to have been the medium to build bridges between people of different lands and cultures. Why he killed himself is even more a mystery.  That is not judgement of his actions – but my pondering about what happens in a person’s life when they determine that their life is over.

Some months ago, a man I knew also ended his life – with a gun. I saw him the week before and he discussed business plans he had for his future. I recall no despair or sadness or a hint of what he was thinking of doing. He was stressed by his responsibilities but future oriented. I was shocked, saddened and angry at what he did to himself and what he left behind for his family, friends, and employees. As an older, white male, he fit the demographic profile of those who succeed at suicide. I don’t know what was going through his mind, but I wish there had been someone who did and had been able to help him choose differently. My assumption is that life is worth living – yours and mine, as people made in the image of God.

I know the theological opinions of some, past and present are harsh towards those who end their life. I focus on God’s mercy, which he delights to show (Micah 7:18), for the friends, the family and loved ones left behind and the one who decided such a course.

For those who hurt and suffer, there are people who care genuinely – reach out, don’t go it alone. There are people who will listen.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline – 1-800-273-8255

Text CONNECT to 741741 from anywhere in the USA, anytime, about any type of crisis.