Defund the Ghouls

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Dr. Jen Gunter (OB/GYN ) in her defense of Planned Parenthood’s practice of abortion had this to say regarding the slice and dice procuring of the human child in the womb:

“These are not “baby parts.” Whether a woman has a miscarriage or an abortion, the tissue specimen is called “products of conception.” In utero, i.e. during pregnancy, we use the term “embryo” from fertilization to ten weeks gestation and “fetus” from ten weeks to birth. The term baby is medically incorrect as it doesn’t apply until birth. Calling the tissue “baby parts” is a calculated attempt to anthropomorphize an embryo or fetus. It is a false image—a ten to twelve week fetus looks nothing like a term baby—and is medically incorrect…There is no reason a conversation about products of conception requires more or less reverence than one about a kidney or a biopsy specimen.”

Definitions, definitions, definitions. While this doctor and perhaps many in the abortion industry rely on such a dehumanizing, linguistic ideology, I find the equating of a body appendage or a biopsy specimen with a human being as ridiculous as well as grotesque. These so called “products of conception” are bearers of the image of God no matter what their level of development. This is only “anthropomorphizing” to a nihilist.

Sadly it is part of the dehumanization required to do the obscenely violent act that ends a human life in abortion and then selectively chops it apart for resale.  No matter what twisted medical terminology is used to justify the hideous industry of Planned Parenthood, it (and its promoters like Dr. Gunter) have more in common with the Josef Mengele school of medicine than the “health care” organization it claims to be.

Its time to defund this ghoulish enterprise.

Exsurge Domine!

Train-Wreck

So eventually it has come to this. Over the last 30 years I have watched the our cultural meltdown concerning human sexuality metastasize from Hugh Hefner and girly mags in brown paper wrappers to “don’t ask, don’t tell” to a rainbow illumined White House, from denominational task force arguments about Bible texts to the Federal redefinition of marriage by judicial decree. Many times I was told by church leaders and other pastors not to cause waves, counseled that it was not a pertinent issue but a dead end distraction, to ignore things and “do mission” instead. I rarely listened to that counsel and did my best to be faithful to the truth but did finally grow weary at congregations that did not want to wrestle with tough moral issues, didn’t want to rock the boat, or instead wanted to fight and fume over pipe organs and chorus music yet still expected God to increase their coffers and people fill their pews. It was the counsel of avoidance – if we just ignore this or pretend it doesn’t matter it will go away. It was the counsel of cowardice – and how has that strategy worked?  The churches and denominations, such as the Episcopal Church in which I was raised, that have capitulated to the culture tsunami of sexual confusion have shrunken and declined. Those more evangelical who have soft-pedaled or censored the truth of God’s wrath against immorality, sexual or otherwise & the requirements of holiness in the name of relevance and market share will now see how lasting the shaky one way bridge of cultural engagement they were trying to build will last.

But now the gloves are off and the make-nice façade of “dialogue” has been exposed as a stalling tactic for the end run it concealed. Pastors, churches, leaders and believers will have to make known where they stand since neutrality is no longer possible. The previous implicit social contract between the culture, the state and “churchianity” of “God & Country” that dates back to colonial days has been dangling by a thread for decades with the hope that “our guys” in office would get us back to the way it was. Forget it. Believers have known for a long time that they can no longer assume or hope that the culture or the state will support their values or beliefs. This will be good for the church. This will be good for God’s people. Now the Gospel, can be demonstrated and revealed not as 10 steps to self-improvement or life balance enhancement within the expectations of upper middle class prosperity but God’s liberating power to transform people created in God’s image from sin’s destructive and damning power. It is also an opportunity for God’s people to shine in our culture’s Stygian morass and to rebuild the shattered lives that will result from the inevitable pile-up that’s coming.

And it is coming. Beyond the dismay so many believers feel is the purpose of God in demonstrating his wrath in action – by removing his restraining grace and abandoning people (giving them up as Romans 1 puts it 3 times) to the warped desires of their hearts. However, there is a future court date set with a Judge of supreme authority (2 Timothy 4:1) who will weigh the nations in the balance – including those nation’s leaders, presidents and jurists.

As always…

  • It is necessary to pray for elected leaders
  • It is necessary to pray for pastors & spiritual leaders
  • It is necessary to pray for churches & ordinary believers who will have to make crucial decisions
  • It is necessary to pray that the Gospel will be boldly proclaimed.
  • It is time to call out to the Triune God to arise and employ us for his purpose so that we can see “The kingdom of the world has become the kingdom of our Lord and of his Messiah, and he will reign for ever and ever.” Revelation 11:15

 

Isis – American Style!

So on the one hand some people in the US are offended by a relic of the past and the end result is it’s removed from public sight –

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On the other hand some people in Iraq are offended by a relic of the past and the end result is its removed from sight –

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What exactly is the difference?
Banishing offensive images is not how problems are solved, conflicts are resolved or wounds are healed.
But maybe that assumes the “banishers” actually want that…

But for How Long?

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“At times our Lord, as judge among the nations, arises to visit the sins of a people upon them. Patience makes room for justice, and Providence determines that guilty nations shall be scourged: at such times they are blessed indeed who can cause the King to stand still. This wicked country of ours has often escaped through the prayers of the saints. No man can read our history without perceiving that among guilty nations we hold a sorrowful place; for we have had more light than any other people, and have sinned against it full often. This erring nation had been scourged to destruction if it had not been that the intercessions of Gods people have caused the Judge of all the earth to stand still. Jesus now rules all nations as Lord of Providence, and metes out justice and judgment among them, but a plea for mercy brings a decree of forbearance, and sinful nations are permitted still to stand within the bounds of grace.”

Charles Spurgeon

War Against the Weeds

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“He can make the dry parched ground of my soul to become a pool and my thirsty barren heart as springs of water. Yes he can make this habitation of dragons this heart which is so full of abominable lusts and fiery temptations to be a place of bounty and fruitfulness unto Himself”
― John Owen, The Mortification of Sin

        I am an amateur, occasional gardener. No such thing you may say but every so often we give it a try. I still consider myself a beginner & no I don’t want well-intentioned advice on how to do it better. We are trying again this summer & planted some tomatoes, chili peppers, eggplant and basil, cilantro & oregano. Due to the uncommon rains in our corner of S.E. Colorado, I have had to spend lots of time on identifying and picking weeds since they have grown in profusion over the last weeks. What started out as a nice, weed free area with a few plants became a small jungle of intertwining opportunistic weeds who not only had spread remarkably fast but have also intertwined with the stuff I want to grow. So for a few hours today I sorted through the soil to root out the interlopers & once again the space looks somewhat weed free – at least for a few days.

Growing something worthwhile takes cultivation. Weeds need no such care – most gardeners won’t find this a surprise. Weeds need no help to thrive. I think there’s a parallel in the life of growing in grace and the Spirit. If I do nothing and kick back and don’t pay attention all kinds of sinful habits will easily sprout up & multiply – no effort required! But those weeds of mind, soul & spirit, if left to themselves will eventually smother the good in an aggressive, intertwining, life draining entanglement and steal the space, nutrients and moisture required by the good. To “bring forth much fruit” (John 15:8) as we are called requires time, attention and care. Those who cared for the soul in former times called for utilizing “the means of grace” – the spiritual disciplines which with the help of the Holy Spirit cultivate the heart, soul, mind and body for God including (but not limited to) prayer, reading the Bible, singing, hearing & listening to the Word of God preached, the Lord’s Table, meditation, confession of sin and serving others.

Growing in grace is not a passive activity. It requires my attention and action as well as at times with the Lord’s help, close up inspection and identification of what may be encroaching in my soul – just like my Anaheim & Jalapeno chilies. As to my battle with the weeds and what the garden hopefully produces – I will keep you posted.

A Visit to the Ft. Lyon Cemetery

Since I have been working nearby I finally visited the Ft. Lyon National Cemetery, next to what used to be the VA hospital at Ft. Lyon in Bent County, CO but is now owned by the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless. While there are numerous graves to look at today, a few caught my eye. A number of them were veterans who fought in the 10 week Spanish American war in 1898 in Cuba and the Philippines.

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The oldest was James Logan of the Colorado Calvary (1862).

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The other was U.S. Army Major William E. Koons who must have been in his late teens in in WW2, and then served in Korea and Vietnam.

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I’ve known a number of veterans over the years. I have  tried to help some. Its hard to imagine what stories they would tell about what they saw and experienced.

“A Future Not Our Own”

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(The Long View –Archbishop Oscar Romero)

It helps, now and then, to step back
and take the long view.
The kingdom is not only beyond our efforts,
it is beyond our vision.

We accomplish in our lifetime only a tiny fraction of
the magnificent enterprise that is God’s work.
Nothing we do is complete,
which is another way of saying
that the kingdom always lies beyond us.

No statement says all that could be said.
No prayer fully expresses our faith.
No confession brings perfection.
No pastoral visit brings wholeness.
No programme accomplishes the church’s mission.
No set of goals and objectives includes everything.

This is what we are about:
We plant seeds that one day will grow.
We water seeds already planted, knowing that they hold future promise.
We lay foundations that will need further development.
We provide yeast that produces effects beyond our capabilities.

We cannot do everything
and there is a sense of liberation in realizing that.
This enables us to do something,
and to do it very well.
It may be incomplete, but it is a beginning, a step along the way,
an opportunity for God’s grace to enter and do the rest.

We may never see the end results,
but that is the difference between the master builder and the worker.
We are workers, not master builders,
ministers, not messiahs.
We are prophets of a future not our own.

Confessions of a Church Shopper

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It’s exciting and challenging to move to a new community but leaving the familiar and established behind means loss whether its friends or knowing who to trust with your car repair or more important relationships in the local church. Since I have been a pastor for many years, in the past moving to a new location and congregation meant having somewhat of an “automatic community.” This time has been different since I am not pastoring. I never thought finding a church would be so hard! Over the last 7 months we have been visiting area churches. So here’s some feedback and ideas from an “official outsider” about what it may be like to visit your church & what you might consider doing when a visitor stops by – at least if you want them to come back.

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We have visited at least 15 different congregations from Baptist to Presbyterian to Independent of various stripes. Of the 15 only 5 had web pages that told the basics of who, what, when & why of their existence. For some, even finding a working phone number has been hard as well as a real human to talk to. One church had a prominent sign but no phone number and another had times for worship posted but were not up to date. I had to visit on a Sunday morning to find out when they worshiped. I have to conclude that these churches are really not interested in having visitors or reaching out to the public – they make it extremely difficult to know what’s going on!

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Visiting a church as a stranger is not easy – it can be even scary and intimidating. It helps to know ahead of time what my family and I might walk into – do I have to dress up or dress down? Speak in tongues or handle snakes? Carry a KJV Bible? Do I need to limber up for the Pentecostal 2 step or bring ear plugs & sunglasses for the worship time? A web site is an easy, inexpensive way to inform people about who you are – I am still amazed that most churches don’t have one. A web site or internet presence is neither hard to create or expensive. There’s no excuse in this day for a congregation not to have one when most people still breathing are connected on-line – unless, you subscribe to an extreme theology of the “invisible church” and really don’t want people to find you!

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The next challenge for the visitor is walking in the door. Honestly, I don’t want to be ignored (which has happened) but I also don’t want to be interrogated such as being asked “what are you doing here” or play 20 questions about my job. The answer should be obvious – checking out whether you are an authentic community of believers in Christ and whether I want to stay or come back! It’s a fine balance between being smothered with inquiries and being given the cold shoulder. How we have been greeted (or not) may be due to living in an area whose population is less mobile & more established than say in a metro area but if a person looks like they are new, chances they are & it’s an opportunity to welcome a stranger who (although perhaps not an angel, i.e. Hebrews 13: 2) may bring gifts that could bless your congregation. Do I really need to mention that I don’t want to be asked “to stand up and introduce myself” – I guess I better – it still happens & I cringe when it does. And please respect my teen age daughters’ boundaries – they don’t like to be hugged, grilled about school or told to smile. Try the Golden Rule – it works!

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I also find it helpful to know what you believe – something written that introduces me to your theology, worship, leadership and activities is very helpful. Who are you? What do you believe? What makes you different? Where are you going? If you cannot summarize that then I may conclude you don’t know. It may not matter to you but it does matter to me and the spiritual health of my family.

While I value worship & preaching and what’s happening “up front,” I am also looking at who I am worshiping with – are the other congregants present and active or bored and checking their cell phones? Is there opportunity for me to know people better and develop relationships or am I expected to show up, stare at the back of someone’s neck and just pay & watch the Sunday morning show?

Maybe this is all too much for a busy pastor on a Sunday morning to consider. Most churches are not busting at the seams with people. There can be many reasons why that is so – it might be it’s because you’re invisible to the community or what does or does not happen when the rare visitor shows up.

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We are still looking for a place to belong. Maybe, our family expectations are too high and we are being too picky as “church shoppers.” I try to extend mercy, grace and benefit of the doubt to where we have visited & the people we have met. I want my family to be part of a living, worshiping community of faith. You never know – we may be that strange family at your place next week. That is if we can find you!

Learning from the Liberal Lexicon

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The President’s comments on 3 Moslems killed in N. Carolina:
“No one in the United States of America should ever be targeted because of who they are, what they look like, or how they worship,”
The President’s view on the Islamic killers that killed 4 Jews in Paris were terrorists who “randomly shoot a bunch of folks in a deli in Paris.”

On Nov. 5, 2009, Major Nidal Hasan shot and killed 12 soldiers and one civilian while wounding or shooting at 30 other soldiers and two police officers at Ft. Hood. Hasan said the shooting was justified because the soldiers he killed were “going against the Islamic Empire.” Administration spokesman called it “workplace violence” and insisted on repeating the fictitious claim that “Islam is a religion of peace.” Eventually the US Army declared it an act of terror

Its unclear why the President bends over backwards to avoid calling an act of hate and terror an act of hate and terror. I suppose that when one equates the Inquisition with Jihadism it should be no surprise (the Inquisition had more in common with the Bush Administration’s CIA torture program than anything resembling the teachings of Jesus).

And now there’s news of an attack on a synagogue in Copenhagen…
I suppose another “random attack.”
I guess some hate crimes are more equal than others….